Recycling In Watauga County

Recycling In Watauga County

Everything You Need To Know All information found in Watauga County recycling guidelines What Can’t Be Recycled? Wire Fences Propane Tanks Aerosol Cans Liquids & Foods Medical Waste Clothing Treated wood Plastic Shopping Bags (Can be recycled at all grocery stores) Compost Used napkins, paper towels, tissues Items coated in plastic/ wax Water hoses Window glass Rigid Plastics Items That Can Only Be Recycled At The 336 Landfill Road In Boone Hazardous Waste Materials (household cleaners, wood polish, etc.) only on HHW day – Found on Calendar Old wheels & tires Cooking oil/ grease Used motor oil Yard Waste Household Appliances Electronics Materials Accepted At All Watauga Co. Convenience Centers Glass – All colors accepted Corrugated cardboard – Must be flattened Plastics – Except for plastic shopping bags Paper & pasteboard – Newspaper, junk mail, clean food boxes, etc. Tin & aluminum – Food containers should be rinsed clean Batteries & lightbulbs – *Large tube lights and car batteries go to main landfill site ONLY Sanitation Schedule Convenience Center Locations & Hours What Holidays Does Vixster Not Operate? We apologize to those customers whose scheduled pickup day falls on these holidays, and who will not have trash service for that week. Vixster may choose to add additional observed holidays in which routes will not occur. Vixster will not operate on the following holidays: Thanksgiving Christmas Eve Christmas Day New Year’s Day Easter The Fourth of…

Wasting Away – How Much Trash do You Produce?

By Robert Grigg Think twice about how much you consume or what you’re consuming. According to Duke University, the average person tosses around four pounds of trash, and about half of the 220 million tons of the stuff produced nationwide end up in our landfills, producing huge amounts of methane emissions while the garbage rots. Because of our large amounts of waste, it’s very important that we do what we can to cut back on what we contribute to the statistic. The two biggest ways to help reduce one’s footprint are: Recycling: reuse as much of those materials as you can, and make things last if you can, then be sure to send them through the right places when you’re done. In just 2014, we managed to recycle almost 90 percent of the year’s corrugated boxes! Composting: Approximately 66 percent of our household waste can be composted, so be sure to pay attention to what you use and look up information to understand what you can and can’t compost. It’s important to be conscientious about what and how much you’re throwing away, but what one absolutely must throw out or put in the recycle bin, you can count on the great folks at Vixster to pick it up and take it where it needs to be. For more information, visit https://center.sustainability.duke.edu and https://www.epa.gov. Feel free to look up your own sources as…

Trash to Gas: Landfills Aren’t the End of the World

By Robert Grigg While the ever-increasing number and size of landfills are certainly problems that shouldn’t be perpetuated, your trash isn’t necessarily just a useless environmental hazard. Due to the nature of how things decompose, landfill gas (LFG) is emitted from these large trash piles. Composed of 50% methane and 50% CO2, landfills can provide a source of “natural” gas. Using a combination of wells and pipe systems, people can harvest these gasses for use as an alternative fuel. Doing this can help offset some of the costs of using other fuels, and is already being used in a number of fields such as the auto industry, food processing, water treatment, and even institutions such as prisons and hospitals. The concept of harvesting natural gas from landfills is already relatively popular, so while you should cut back on your waste disposal, your trash might possibly be harvested as gas in a sense. For more information on landfill gas and its uses, visit The EPA’s website, or check out this cool illustration below found on Advanced Disposal.com…